Can Dogs Eat Mango?

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Can Dogs Eat Mango? Like their human counterparts, many dogs like mango taste, but is it healthy for our furry friends to eat that? Yes, it is. However, you must be careful about which sections of the fruit you offer and how much of it your dog can safely eat.

Let’s look at how mangoes can be eaten safely by dogs.

Can Dogs Eat Mango? Or Should They Be Avoided?

Yes, you can serve mangoes as sweet treats or healthy snacks. Vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein, and dietary fiber contribute to a dog’s overall well-being.

Here are some of the advantages of serving mango to your dog:

Vitamin A

As a dietary supplement, vitamin A helps maintain healthy vision (particularly in older dogs), prevent cataracts, and alleviate night blindness and dry eyes. Vitamin A is also beneficial to dogs’ skin and coats. Furthermore, it can promote their kidneys, liver, and lungs health.

Read also: Can dogs eat Cucumber?

High Protein

Mangoes are high in protein, which may help with muscle and other essential body tissue repair and prevent degenerative diseases, skin problems, allergies, and some cancers.

Potassium

In addition, mangoes are a fantastic source of potassium, which aids in the health of your dog’s nervous and muscular systems. Additionally, it alleviates diarrhea and constipation when they have an upset tummy since it keeps their digestive system running properly.

can a dog eat mango

Is Dried Mango Safe For Dogs?

Dried mangoes contain a large quantity of sugar, carbs, and calories, making them a bad idea. Even if a tiny bit of dried mango will not get your dog an adverse effect. However, you should stick to the fresh kind since the drying process removes some of the fruit’s health advantages. In addition, dry mango may induce stomach distress and tooth rot in dogs that need pricey canine dental cleanings in the future.

Can Mangoes Make My Dog Sick?

Even though mangoes have several health advantages, they might be dangerous for dogs in some situations. So be on the lookout for the following issues, and remember that dogs are involved.

  • If your dog has a medical issue like pancreatitis or diabetes, you should avoid mangoes since they need a specialized diet to be healthy. Before introducing new items to your pet’s diet, consult with your veterinarian.
  • The mango’s skin contains Urushiol. It is a component found in poison ivy and poison oak that may cause an itchy rash if it comes into contact with your dog’s skin. Aside from being difficult to eat, the peel of mangoes may cause stomach distress, vomiting, or intestinal obstruction.
  • Avoid mango pits! You should remove mango pits to avoid choking hazards. A blockage in the digestive system may be life-threatening for your dog if it ingests a mango pit that becomes lodged in the intestines.

What Should I Do If My Dog Shows Obstruction?

If your dog shows signs of obstruction, it might be because it ate a mango pit.

Diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, breathing problems, constipation, and stomach bloat are possible symptoms.

If you see any of these signs in your dog, you should seek urgent veterinary attention since some of these symptoms are life-threatening if left behind. Ask your vet if you’re not sure whether your dog ate a mango pit. A physical exam and x-rays might be recommended as diagnostic procedures.

Read also: Can dogs eat carrots?

You don’t need to be alarmed if your dog eats mango peel. However, look for any indications of blockage (such as vomiting or diarrhea) and contact your veterinarian if necessary.

With pet insurance, you may be compensated for the expenses of major and minor ailments, including gastrointestinal disorders, UTIs, ear infections, arthritis, and cancer. Everything from the diagnostics to the treatment your dog needs might be covered by this insurance. When coping with the strain of taking care of a sick pet, financial assistance like this might be a lifesaver.

can dogs eat mango

How Many Mangoes Can a Dog Eat?

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, one cup of mango has 99 calories and 22.5 grams of sugar. Therefore, overconsumption of sweeteners derived from fruits may cause health problems.

Due to mango’s high fiber content, dogs may get an upset stomach if they consume too much of the fruit. Consuming dietary fiber in moderation may benefit dogs, but overconsumption can cause diarrhea. Therefore, treats should not make up more than 10% of your dog’s total daily calorie consumption.

Mango may cause an allergic reaction in some dogs, so start with a modest quantity to ensure there aren’t any adverse side effects. See your veterinarian if you’re unsure how many mangoes to give your dog according to its weight, size, and medical history.

What Are the Best Ways to Serve Mango to Dogs?

Here are a few ideas for serving mango to your dog so that he may get the health advantages that come with it:

  1. Wash the mango well, peel it and remove the pit.
  2. Your dog’s size will determine how much fruit you need to chop up. Bite-sized chunks are best for puppies because they can’t choke on them. Larger dogs can eat mango slices because the flesh is soft and easy to swallow.

Another option is to mix the mangoes into some cottage cheese or freeze them in water and present them as a cool summer treat.

Mangoes that are beyond their prime should never be fed to your dog. Dogs are especially vulnerable to the toxic effects of ethanol (alcohol) produced by rotten fruit. Vomiting, tremors, and convulsions are all symptoms of canine alcohol poisoning, and they all require immediate veterinary attention.

Read also: Can Dogs eat Cheese?

Can Dogs Eat Mango? Final Thoughts

As long as you remove the peel and pit, dogs may eat mango as an occasional special treat.

You should only offer dogs mango in moderation to prevent weight and gastrointestinal problems, even if the fruit is healthy in moderation.

Before introducing new items to your dog’s diet, always check with your veterinarian to ensure it’s healthy for them.

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